1910 Jopson Motor: Before & After

When Art Gaier first received the Jopson Motor it was missing pieces and looking pretty old and worn.  After many internet searches and talking to people, he met and started conversing with the owner of another Jopson Motor in England.  Between the two of them they had complete parts for one full engine and were able to provide measurements, photographs and drawings of missing parts to the other.  Also helpful was the information provided in the 1916 Model Aeroplanes and Their Motors (which in and of itself was basically a re-print of an article found in the March 30, 1912 issue of Flight Magazine).

A twin-cylinder engine, mounted on a wooden base, is missing several props, as well as its prop.  3/4 view.
Art Gaier’s 1910 Jopson Motor looked like this before he began restoration work.
A twin-cylinder engine, mounted on a wooden base, is missing several props, as well as its prop.  View from tank.
Another shot of Art Gaier’s 1910 Jopson Motor before restoration work began.
A twin-cylinder engine, mounted on a wooden base, is missing several props, as well as its prop.  Direct side view.
Side view of Art Gaier’s 1910 Jopson Motor before restoration work began.

Art, who has an engineering background, was able to use the provided information to machine the missing parts.

An unassembled two cylinder engine on a white background.
Art Gaier unassembled the 1910 Jopson Motor before the restoration process began. Here’s the parts he started with.
A gear on a lathe.
Art Gaier manufactured several of the missing parts needed to restore his 1910 Jopson Motor.
A gear on a lathe.
Art Gaier manufactured several of the missing parts needed to restore his 1910 Jopson Motor.
A part being pressed out by a drill.  Detailed drawings and two similar parts are laying nearby.
Art Gaier manufactured several of the missing parts needed to restore his 1910 Jopson Motor.

NMAM-Jopson-gear4

Now complete, his engine looks pretty much ready to run!

A view looking down and slightly to the side of the restored 1910 Jopson Motor.
The restored 1910 Jopson Motor, on loan to the museum by Art Gaier.
A top down view of the restored 1910 Jopson Motor.
The restored 1910 Jopson Motor, on loan to the museum by Art Gaier.
The restored 1910 Jopson Motor displayed with its large wood prop.
The restored 1910 Jopson Motor, on loan to the museum by Art Gaier.

Want to know more? Check out the carburetor!

Come and see this in person anytime between Memorial Day and Labor Day 2017!

—————————————————————————
For more information on the National Model Aviation Museum, including our location, hours and admission fees visit: www.modelaircraft.org/museum

6 comments

  1. Wow what a nice looking engine. Mr. Jobson would be proud that you brought it back to its former glory. It has aged well for being a centenarian.

  2. The Jobson engine should be considered the “Cadillac” model airplane engine among collectors based on the scarcity of survivors. It would be very sought-after since only two are known to exist.

  3. The pictures in your story are very nice. The Jobson must have had the initial spark for the spark plugs from from a coil and dry-cell batteries? The ignition points must be located behind the tank?

    1. Yes, a coil and dry cell batteries were required to start the engine. The ignition points are located on the camshaft between the tank and the engine. You can just see them in the top-down picture.

Leave a Reply to Tony Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.